Unholy Testament: The Beginnings by Carole Gill

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Carole’s foray into history is written in beautiful prose that sticks in the brain. I love Ms. Gill’s “old world” writing style, the lyrical voice that seems to bleed so effortlessly into the pages.

Believing he has fallen in love with Rose, Eco pens a confession documenting all sins he has committed during his immortal existence; from Ancient Egyptian vampire cults, Roman vampire brothels, The Dark Ages, The Crusades, The Black Death of 1348, on to his meeting with the child murderer and satanist Gilles de Rais, and concluding with his wicked, blood-soaked affair with the Blood Countess herself, Erzebat Bathory.

The pages are filled with debauchery, vice and murder. How can one stained with so much blood and evil possibly be trusted?

The second book in Carole Gill’s Blackstone Vampires series, Unholy Testament – The Beginnings  continues the dark, captivating story of Rose Baines and her family.

Review by SKN Hammerstone:

Carole Gill
Carole Gill

Once again I was blown away by the amazing vampires that have sprung from the imagination of Carole Gill. Unholy Testament- The Beginnings continues the story started in The House on Blackstone Moor by going back in time to the telling of how the evil demon Eco came to be.

This book shows every depraved and evil side of not only Eco but the creatures and vampires he raised up as well. It travels through history with mention of historical characters such as Cleopatra, Atila the Hun, Joan of Arc, and many others.

I have read quite a few vampire books and none have captivated me as much as this series. It brings out the true meaning of both vampires and dark, gothic romance.

Review by Lovebooks:

Is it possible to feel sympathy for a devious, evil creature like Eco? He is doomed from the start and acts from pure self-interest but somehow, Carole Gill gives this incredibly flawed character a deeper dimension.

There were times I truly felt sorry for him, while hating him the next moment, but one thing this story didn’t leave me is indifferent. Written in a journal-style narrative – it is, after all, Eco’s testament that the book is about – the language flows and moves at a rhythmic pace, keeping the reader’s interest.

The author dives deep into the suspense of the story right from the start. We know something terrible is about to happen, and when it does, we’re left wondering how it will all unfold. Eco is a very interesting character and his story is heartbreaking, shocking, and frightening at the same time.

It is worth telling and Carole’s foray into history is written in beautiful prose that sticks in the brain. I love Ms. Gill’s “old world” writing style, the lyrical voice that seems to bleed so effortlessly into the pages.

That voice is kept alive and well in this sequel to The House on Blackstone Moor. Indeed, it is made more compelling. I have to give this story five stars and nothing less.